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"...public opinion deserves to be respected as well as despised" G.W.F. Hegel, 'Philosophy of Right'

a roadmap of sorts « Previous | |Next »
September 4, 2013

Apart from rolling back the policies and institutions that support renewable energy what do we know about what a coalmine loving Coalition government would do. Apart from a number of promises on the table to bring the budget back to surplus.

Tim Colebatch in his Labor's problems will soon be Abbott's woes provides an outline of a post election roadmap.

PettyBthump.jpg Bruce Petty

It's not much of a roadmap but it's a start in terms of sketchily outlining the implications of the Coalition's slogan fiscal irresponsibility slogan with respect to austerity rather than how the economy will be much better managed. Colebatch says:

We know that new Coalition governments always tell us the budget is in worse shape than Labor said, and that they will have to make cuts they did not announce in the campaign so we can get back to surplus....We know that Hockey will order a Commission of Audit, which will recommend more spending cuts. They will establish a Productivity Commission inquiry into workplace relations that will propose changes that go well beyond Abbott's official policy. The commission's inquiry into the car industry will recommend an end to industry support. We know all that, because that's what they always do.

This will work because people think that all those tens of billions of dollars in deficits, adding up to hundreds of billions in debt, are putting the country’s future prosperity, perhaps even its viability, at risk. Most voters have bought the Coalition’s “debt and deficits” narrative – that powerful political tool that has buttressed every complaint about the government.

Colebatch's sketch doesn't take us very far. The Coalition's empty rhetoric about trust fills the silence about how best to respond to the slowing of the mining boom, the need to reinvent much of the economy or how to ensure that the sprawling housing developments in the capital cities are accompanied by the necessary infrastructure such as train lines, roads and schools.

The context of the shortfall in government revenue created by the world conditions caused by the global financial crisis. That ongoing shortfall implies a considerable cutting back of government services and that effectively results in greater inequality through more middle class welfare at the expense of the more disadvantaged. Examples that come to mind include removing the means-testing from the private health insurance rebate or abolishing the low-income super contribution rebate.

If you start to unpack the inequality in a prosperous Australia then you begin to realize that the discontent that the expresses itself in complaints about politics and politicians, or the complaints about rising costs and rising public debt, refers to a sense that that people aren't getting a fair share and that things are going backwards. Australia is becoming more unequal, whilst a constantly changing daily life is becoming more complex. The pursuit of happiness feels akin to chasing the gold at the end of the rainbow.

| Posted by Gary Sauer-Thompson at 9:44 AM | | Comments (12)
Comments

Comments

The Coalition's fear-mongering about debt and deficit will be downplayed as it would face the same struggle to get the budget back to surplus that Labor faced.

Budgget deficits are a real big worry when they'r being incurred by the ALP, but they're not much of a worry under the Coalition.

We need a road map of the Coalition's government because the polls says that the Coalition is set to win an overwhelming victory.

The election is shaping up to be like the 1996 election, when Labor won just 46.4% of the Two Party Preferred vote and just 49 seats in the 148 seat House of Representatives.

"The election is shaping up to be like the 1996 election, when Labor won just 46.4% of the Two Party Preferred vote and just 49 seats in the 148 seat House of Representatives."

That means the ALP will be out of power for a decade?

"the shortfall in government revenue created by the world conditions caused by the global financial crisis."

The Coalition's assumption is that a surge in confidence after its victory and pro-business policies will correct the record drop in company profits seen in the last earnings season. Abbott is relying on that turnaround to increase tax revenue and stop him sliding into a Wayne-Swan-style series of deficits.

It's spin.

A coalition victory will restore confidence.

The assumption is that the looming Coalition landside win on Saturday is virtually certain to trigger a series of housing booms in Australia. A

If so it's a debt fuelled boom folks.

The myth that Labor has been bad, and therefore the Coalition must be better because it is pro-business, will soon be exploded.

It will be seen that the Coalition is aligned with, and defends, the gambling industry, big polluters, private health insurers, multinational miners and others helping themselves from the public trough.

How long can Australia go as long on a high-polluting natural-resource-intensive economic structure.

Forever, says the Coalition, as they continue to subsidise their crony capitalism.

"We know that Hockey will order a Commission of Audit, which will recommend more spending cuts."

This has become the standard operating procedure for an incoming Liberal National Party government, and the outcome is entirely predictable.

The script never varies. The Commission will announce a discovery that the public finances are far worse than the outgoing Labor government admitted, and will advise the government to ditch many of its election promises

The abandoned promises won’t include handouts to business or favoured political groups – the necessary cuts will focus on health, education and payments to the poor and disadvantaged.

Therein lies the imposed fiscal austerity

The idealogues of Big Business say: "The end of the mining boom means that hard choices have to be made about the future of the Australian economy."

'Hard choices' means imposed austerity

the Coalition is aligned with, and defends, the gambling industry, big polluters, private health insurers, multinational miners and others helping themselves from the public trough.

It's in the name---Coalition --its all about coal and a return to a 19th century economy (logging and pulping, mining and unregulated fishing) with its degraded landscapes.

"How to ensure that the sprawling housing developments in the capital cities are accompanied by the necessary infrastructure such as train lines, roads and schools."

many people reckon that they cannot afford to buy a house anywhere but on the urban fringe, and that often means a three-and-a-half hour commute for them.

"Most voters have bought the Coalition’s “debt and deficits” narrative "

The Coalition has been relying on the electorate’s distrust of Labor after their self-obsessed infighting, and the view that it’s time someone else had a go because Labor is broken.