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Background to Iraqi War « Previous | |Next »
March 13, 2003

This provides a good descriptive account of the background to the war---one has been going on since the invasion of Kuwait. Its argument is that the current strategies by the Bush administration are attempts by that administration to use Iraq as a test case for the Bush doctrine of the pre-emptive strike.

What remains in the background is the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. But it is the US support of Israel, and the latter's unwillingness (refusal?) to accept a democratic multinational (or bi-national) state, that continues to create tensions and antagonisms in the Middle East. This Israel-Palestine conflict is rarely mentioned in the Oz blogging world. So we need some backgrround. This and this previous edition on The Palestinian-Israeli dimension to war in Iraq are a start. Also this bit of history about the The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict is useful. History is important on this, as explained here

And for an interesting discussion on Al-Jazeera, see this. An interesting suggestion came out of this discussion---capture and sell Saddam Hussein in the slave market. For an account of the complex relations between the US, Saudi Arabia and Iraq that places the Palestine-Israel question centre stage, see this excellent essay Beyond the Wedge. This acount of the relationship between Arab intellectuals and the American 'prince' is insightful.

I fully concur with the pathway of Edward Said on this. He says ):

"...some mode of arrangement has to be established that allows them to live together in some peaceable form. And it's not going to be through separation. It's not going to be the way the Oslo process has forecasted, nor will it be the way I and many others used to talk about--namely partition, that there should be two states.

There is another factor which I think is very important: There is a younger generation--beginning with the Palestinians who are Israeli citizens--who are extremely aware of the difficulty that they face as an oppressed minority and are beginning to struggle in terms of civil and citizens' rights.

Interestingly, they are supported, implicitly, by secular Israelis who are extremely worried about the increased power of the clerics and the whole question of defining the laws of the state by religious means in this debate about "Who is a Jew?" A fairly important body of opinion that is secular has begun to talk about things like a constitution--since Israel doesn't have a constitution--and the notion of citizenship, which defines people not by ethnic but by national criteria. This would then have to include Arabs. That's very impressive to me. I've talked to groups from both sides, independently and together. The trajectory is unmistakable."

A liberal state that citizenship, which defines people not by ethnic but by national criteria, and fully embraces mutinationality is a good pathway to walk out of the present catastrophe.

| Posted by Gary Sauer-Thompson at 11:25 PM | | Comments (1)
Comments

Comments

My opinion is that the strick on Iraqi was unjust.