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"...public opinion deserves to be respected as well as despised" G.W.F. Hegel, 'Philosophy of Right'

oh yeah « Previous | |Next »
September 17, 2003

So the case for invading Iraq remains rock solid? Yes, says an editorial in The Australian. It says that not even a dent has been made in the case for going to war.

I'm not kidding you:


"Revelations that the peak British intelligence committee warned of risks in disarming Saddam Hussein have generated much ado about very little....The fact their warnings did not sway the British Government does not mean Prime Minister Tony Blair and his colleagues were derelict - they considered this, along with the committee's other advice, and made the decision to attack Iraq on the basis of all the evidence before them, evidence which was overwhelmingly in favour of the case for war."


Funny, I thought the justifications for war were faulty. Iraq was not involved in 9/11; Iraq was not closely to connected al Qaeda; and there is lot of doubt about Iraq's ongoing production of weapons of mass destruction. The weapons of mass destruction that we were told Saddam had stockpiled, could use against the West at short notice or might pass on to Islamic terrorists, have disappeared.

Not to worry. There are no doubts for The Australian:


"As a British parliamentary inquiry into the intelligence provided to the Blair Government put it last week 'there was convincing intelligence that Iraq had active, chemical, biological and nuclear programs'. Which is far more positive than the admission by the BBC's director-general, Greg Dyke, that his subordinates considered the story involving now deceased weapons scientist David Kelly, which alleged the Government had sexed-up the case for war, was 'marred by flawed reporting'".

This is hard to square with this or this. Nothing about a proper accounting of the Howard Government's decision-making. There is nothing murky in domestic politics being hidden at all, and there is no need to build a climate of acountability.

Nor is any case made by The Australian that Iraq was an imminent threat to Australia. So the case for doing right amounts to little more than going along with the US for the sake of the alliance.

Oh, and it was a good outcome. Saddam was removed. There is nothing here about the US occupation of Iraq going badly wrong, the lack of a democrated Iraq, the big failure in nation building in Afghanistan, or the failure of military fix to solve political problems.

| Posted by Gary Sauer-Thompson at 12:39 PM | | Comments (1)
Comments

Comments

Sounds like the Murdoch press playing their usual games again. Trouble is, it's so transparently ludicrous