Thought-Factory.net Philosophical Conversations Public Opinion philosophy.com Junk for code
parliament house.gif
RECENT ENTRIES
SEARCH
ARCHIVES
Commentary
Media
Think Tanks
Oz Blogs
Economic Blogs
Foreign Policy Blogs
International Blogs
Media Blogs
South Australian Weblogs
Economic Resources
Environment Links
Political Resources
Cartoons
South Australian Links
Other
www.thought-factory.net
"...public opinion deserves to be respected as well as despised" G.W.F. Hegel, 'Philosophy of Right'

whistling in the wind « Previous | |Next »
March 17, 2006

A paragraph from the editorial in today's Australian newspaper says:

Australia is a middle power with middle-power responsibilities. But we are a substantial middle power, the world's 14th largest economy, with stable government and a highly competent military. We therefore have responsibilities to contribute to global security and economic order. In supporting the US effort to spread the values of democracy and human rights in the Middle East, and in fighting the evil of terrorism there, Australia is not only doing the right thing in principle, it is furthering its own national interests.

It's the deputy sheriff policing argument isn't it. And fighting a Sunni insurgency aqainst the continuing US occupation in Iraq is misrepresented as fighting the evil of terrorism.

No wonder this is the consequence:

LeahyA10.jpg
Leahy

And this is the way the US and Australia spread the values of democracy and human rights in the Middle East. An attack on the Sunni-dominated city of Samarra, 125 kilometers north of Baghdad, which has been the nucleus of the national resistance since the fall of Baghdad.

The democracy rhetoric is no longer plausible or even persuasive. The reality is that of a central government in Iraq---without sovereignty, the means of coercion, administration and significant economic resources --cowering in Baghdad's Green Zone. The Americans occupy their bases, and any place they care to temporarily put their troops, but no place else. In southern Iraq the Shia religious parties, and in the north, Kurdish parties, each have their own militias and established local governments that are at odds with the central government and the Americans.

The Australian is whistling in the wind. So are Condelezza Rice and Alexander Downer, who are still singing from the same songsheet--- that Iraq will overcome the insurgency and move towards a liberal democracy. The one songsheet the two voices should lbe singing from is 'cut and run'. If the people the U.S. military is ostensibly protecting want it to go, why do the soldiers stay?

| Posted by Gary Sauer-Thompson at 9:52 AM | | Comments (0)
Comments