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"...public opinion deserves to be respected as well as despised" G.W.F. Hegel, 'Philosophy of Right'

goodbye Saddam « Previous | |Next »
December 27, 2006

It looks as if Saddam Hussein's death from execution will come shortly. Few will shed any tears for this dictator, given the way he brutalized, tortured and killed the Iraqi people.

Osama.jpg
Osama

It is apparent from the Iraq Study Group report that Iraq isn't going to have a democracy in any meaningful time frame. Nor a stable, pro-American, anti-Iranian government. So why is the US,. UK and Australia fighting in Iraq? To install a Shi'ite state align with Iran? An American answer by Emily Miller in the Washington Post. It demands some accountibility from the nation's leaders.

The Post has a photo essay entitled Life at a Ramadi Outpost It shows how the US troops are in hostile territory, where a hearts and minds strategy no longer works. The Iraqi's do not want the US there.

Juan Cole has a post on the top ten myths about Iraq. It's good stuff and required reading. Deconstructing myths around the war on terror is necessay because the core resistance to the US Iraq is not al-Qaeda---it is an insurgency by Suuni Arabs acting as spoilers. Deconstructing myths is also necessary because Iraq has become a farce. We now have British troops attacking the police at the al-Jamiat police station that they established and with whom they had been theoretically working for nearly four years. As Roy Hattersley observes in The Guardian:

among their regular activities, they [the police at the al-Jamiat police station] crushed prisoners' hands and feet, electrocuted them and burned them with cigarettes. You will recall that one of the reasons given to justify the invasion and occupation of Iraq was the obligation to save the people from that sort of atrocity. It now appears that, at least in al-Jamiat police station, the arrival of what is bravely described as democracy has not made much difference.

President Bush assures us that he is working on a plan for victory. As Condelezza Rice says about Iraq:
This is a country that is worth the investment because once it emerges as a country that is a stabilizing factor, you'll have a very different kind of Middle East. And I know that from the point of view of not just monetary costs, but the sacrifice of American lives, a lot has been sacrificed for Iraq, a lot has been invested in Iraq.

So what is the dividend?

| Posted by Gary Sauer-Thompson at 10:54 PM | | Comments (5)
Comments

Comments

I think is the British had of been a bit less greedy and truer to their word when carving the area up the Us would not be there now cleaning up the mess they made. Australia too has some obligations.

Les,
I'm not sure what obligations Australia has re Iraq other than paying their premiums on their insurance to the US.

Still the offical line is bullish. The war in Afghanistan is being won, even if the Third Afghan War has the makings of a debacle. The Taliban insurgents have been forced out of some areas but are stronger than ever across the south-east region. The city of Kandahar is beyond their grasp - not that they want it for the moment - but the roads and the countryside are largely theirs.

Well it has an obligation to stay and help clean up the bloody mess that they contributed to for starters.
Engineers and builders....NOT guns

I think that it has gone past that. The occupation forces have outstayed their welcome. The Iraqi people want them out. It's their country after all.

As Juan Cole oberves in the above link:

Winning guerrilla wars requires two victories, a military victory over the guerrillas and a winning of the hearts and minds of the general public, thus denying the guerrillas support. The US has not and is unlikely to be able to repress the guerrillas, and it is losing hearts and minds at an increasing and alarming rate. They hate us, folks. They don't want us there.

Yes, perhaps you are right.
As a Great and Wise man once said; It Belongs to Them. Lets Give it Baaack!