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"...public opinion deserves to be respected as well as despised" G.W.F. Hegel, 'Philosophy of Right'

the political circus is back in town « Previous | |Next »
January 23, 2013

Some say that political activity is pretty much on hold until the tennis is finished, or the cricket is out of the way, or the usual conservative nationalist rhetoric about Australia Day has been washed away.

You know, all that rhetoric about Australia being a part of the Anglosphere that share a common history, culture, language, a Westminster form of government, legal concepts like common law, habeas corpus and innocent until proven guilty. Australia is a Christian nation with a Judeo-Christian heritage---not a multicultural nation founded on violence.

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Politics hasn't really gone away. What has been put on hold for the Xmas break is the usual “circus” of ministers and MP's attending events in their constituencies: unveiling plaques, kissing babies, making stump speeches, and constituent schmoozing. The extensive electoral work is a form of pastoral care, and it is a perpetual electioneering, especially for those MP's in marginal seats. This is politics making a difference.

The electioneering on the campaign trail has begun along with the claim that said politician are in regular contact with the “real Australia” of the constituency/electorate, and that only they can deliver a better deal to the working families of Australia.

The conservative commentary has also picked up from where it left off last year. Thus Janet Albrechtsen continues with her anti-Julia Gillard commentary in The Australian. In PM's fake feminism is man made Albrechtsen states that:

By using baseless allegations and seeking the solace of victimhood for ulterior motives, our Prime Minister has let Australian women down. In a headlong collision between politics and ethics, the politically ruthless PM chose to debase the one issue that seemed dear to her heart -- championing the cause of women. If a female PM recklessly and ruthlessly uses gender as a weapon, isn't that PM saying to other women: "Go girl, go ahead, make serious allegations, never mind the lack of evidence, so long as it furthers your agenda."

According to Albrechtsen, Gillard and Tanya Plibersek and Nicola Roxon have a fraudulent feminist chip on their shoulder. They have used confected outrage to launch a dishonourable gender war.

Isn't Albretechsten using gender as a weapon to defend Tony Abbott's conservatism and sexism? Albrechtsen is silent about the verbal savagery of the personal attacks on her by some leading members of the opposition, including Tony Abbott. Attacks, we can recall from the AWU slush-fund scandal, premised more on innuendo than facts showing misconduct by Gillard.

| Posted by Gary Sauer-Thompson at 6:59 AM | | Comments (5)
Comments

Comments

"According to Albrechtsen Gillard and Tanya Plibersek and Nicola Roxon have a fraudulent feminist chip on their shoulder. They have used confected outrage to launch a dishonourable gender war. "

So why do so many women distrust Tony Abbott's conservatism then?

The Australian flag, the conservative's symbol of unity, has been used as a kind of rallying symbol for a racist action.

Its association with the Cronulla riot, where it had been worn as a cape, has turned it into a weapon. It was used by whites to say this is what is really Australian, you are not.

"Why do so many women distrust Tony Abbott's conservatism then"

Abbott’s low approval rating with women has to do with the brutality of his political language as well as his sexism.

its not just the usual conservative nationalist rhetoric about Australia Day that is annoying---its also the rhetoric about Gillard being an illegitimate prime minister

"Politics hasn't really gone away. "

.Julia Gillard’s announcement on Tuesday that she had demanded that the ALP national executive suspend party processes, dump a sitting senator and put in a “captain’s pick” outsider can be seen as calculated, election-year symbolism.