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scaremongering « Previous | |Next »
August 15, 2005

I've been off-line since Thursday as I've spent the last few days cruising the Eden Valley in South Australia checking out the riesling and other wines.

So I haven't been listening to the news at all, nor watching TV, listening to the radio or reading newspapers.

Moir.jpg

Whilst flying into Canberra this morning I glanced at The Australian, as this newspaper is reputed to be the best political newspaper in Australia. I could not help but notice this article by John Stone, a former Treasury Secretary and National Party senator. Stone is arguing the case of assimmilation. This addresses:

"...Australia's rapidly growing Muslim problem. But [Australia] clearly still wants to avoid the real issues: the need to abandon outright our official multiculturalism policies and the need to sharply reduce, to the point of virtually halting, further inflow of people whose culture (Islam) is such that there can be no realistic hope of them ever integrating into Australian society."

Why should they integrate?

What is the problem of living in an increasingly Muslim-influenced Australia? Isn't it a question of Muslim's obeying the public laws of the nation-state?

Not for John Stone:

In short, we must fundamentally rethink our immigration policies and our official policies of multiculturalism (that is, non-assimilation). Our future immigration policy should focus on whether those concerned are capable of assimilating into an Australian culture shaped by, and part of, a Judeo-Christian Western civilisation.

Why so? I'm an Australian citizen and my values are not those of the a Judeo-Christian Western civilisation. I, along with a lot of other Australians, am a child of the Enlightenment, which stands in opposition to the Judeo-Christian tradition.

The question that needs to be asked of John Sttone is: why should Australia's culture be defined in religious rather than secular terms?

| Posted by Gary Sauer-Thompson at 12:37 PM | | Comments (2)
Comments

Comments

I find it interesting that the likes of Stone forget to mention Ancient Greece as a basis of Western Civilization.

Maybe the inclusion of 'Greeks' into the argument sounds too multi-cultural or 'woggy'?

Savvas
good point.

It should read Athens and Jerusalem.That would be a more accurate representation of Australian culture and tradition.