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Labor on Social Inclusion « Previous | |Next »
November 23, 2007

Amongst all the noise of a closing election campaign it would be easy, especially out in the boondoks, even with broadband, to miss yesterdays release of the Labor Party's policy document on Social Inclusion. Easy to find on the Party's web site.

It draws together so many social issues that in Australia result in the exclusion of many different groups. It proposes Ministerial level authority, with a Board and extensive consultative arrangements across portfolios and community groups. At this late stage of the campaign it is well worth a read. Only 12 pages, but a contribution to forming public opinion!

Julia Gillard's address to ACOSS's Annual General Conference on 22 Nov. is on the same subject.

| Posted by Len at 10:43 AM | | Comments (3)
Comments

Comments

what is the significance of an election process in which voters don't know in advance what a party will do?

sham? charade? self-delusion?

al loomis,
How true. Any Party!

Len
I see that Gillard says that
reducing disadvantage is now a both a moral and economic imperative for Australia; and that fairness and prosperity are utterly inseparable. She adds:

...that turning our backs on the disadvantaged will come at a serious cost to our economic future. Too many individuals and communities remain caught in a spiral of low school attainment, high unemployment and under-employment, poor health, high imprisonment rates and child abuse. Too many Australians are socially excluded.

But if we are going to solve the problem of social exclusion we have to develop a new agenda that can bring social and economic policy together to complement each other.

Sounds promising, doesn't it. I'll have a closer look and get back.