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November 28, 2008

Words Without Pictures, was created by the Photography Department at the Los Angeles Country Museum of Art, as a way to expand dialogue about photography. The essays are seen as a prime stimulus for generating discussion about emergent issues for photography.

GollingsJBrisbane.jpg John Gollings, Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane

John Gollings, best known for his architectural photographs, would appear to be grounded in 5x4 film based architectural photography and would be seen as a traditional type of photography: one where architectural photographers had interpreted their subject with the aid of various films, lenses, points of view and darkroom techniques. So how does this style of work and its ethos connect to the internet? Is there a different way of looking at photography due to the internet?

Gollings said that we are already living in the “post photographic era”. He meant that photographs may be digitally scanned and manipulated using personal computers and readily available software. In saying this Gollings was, flagging a new era of architectural photographs---and photography.

One of the essays is Jason Evans' Online Photographic Thinking, and he makes the following comment:

I guess it is simply a matter of time before a generation not weaned on paper and chemicals sees the manufactured bubble of “art photography” for what it is, and begins to explore the potential of an inclusive, affordable distribution network and its inherently interesting formal qualities.

An interesting online photographic site is run by Tim Barber and it shows the potential of the internet for photography. It indicates the issues of issues of form and aesthetics that are rightly serious ones for a photographer working in traditional craft print form and the art market become lightened and are more in the background when thinking and working in the internet and photography world.

GollingsJGoMABrisbane.jpg John Gollings, Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane

An important shift in photography's history is taking place.

| Posted by Gary Sauer-Thompson at 7:58 AM |