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photography related blogs « Previous | |Next »
December 6, 2010

Here is a list of 10 Photography Related Blogs that you should read sooner rather than latter to sample the diversity of writing about the contemporary photographic culture.

The work of these author bloggers (as opposed to the content aggregators) indicate just how quickly the internet is developing in terms of its free content and web platforms, and the significance of the photographic book in contemporary photography.

I know some of these blogs from stumbling across, and dipping into, them. The ones I don't know are Andrew Hetherington's What's the Jackanory?, Miguel Garcia-Guzman's EV +/-] Exposure Compensation, and Douglas Stockdale's The Photographic Book.

There were no Australian-based photography related blogs. As one would expect, since this list of blogs reflects the dominance of American photographic culture. There is just a fact of the globalized digital world. On the other hand there is probably not much online and free writing about photography in Australian photographic culture.

As far as I know, despite the commitment to an open culture amongst photographers, there is no web based photographic magazine being produced in Australia. What we have for the moment is Flickr as the photographic archive of image production in postmodernity with its collapse of the old distinctions between professional and amateur and private and public.

This archive of everyday Australian photography on Flickr is so chaotic that any kind of unity --ie 'Australian photography'--is nigh on impossible. It stands in contrast to the Art institution's curated and archive in the form of a photographic canon. The latter form of the archive is a restricted order

| Posted by Gary Sauer-Thompson at 10:07 PM |