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Mining heritage in Tasmania « Previous | |Next »
April 6, 2011

A lot of the ruins of mining in Tasmania are hard to uncover, even though Tasmania’s west coast is at the heart of the state’s mining industry. Zinc, iron, tin, copper were mined and as a result of this, this part of western Tasmania is crisscrossed by a freight rail network that was used to transport ores to the coast, from where it was shipped to the rest of the British Empire. Little is now left of this history.

nla.Zeehan Smelters.jpg
E Searle, Mt Lyell Mining Co. Smelters in Queenstown, Tasmania, circa 1911-1915

The Tasmanian Smelter Co site at Zeehan, which I have been exploring, has been dismantled. I've no idea when the smelter stopped operating. In the early 20th century is my guess, after the region's mines ran out.

I know nothing about the North East Dundas Tramway from Zeehan to Williamsford, even though I wandered around Zeehan.

| Posted by Gary Sauer-Thompson at 10:22 PM | | Comments (1)
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I do know that Zeehan was named after Abel Tasman's brig, the ’Zeehan’.