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If there are diverse kinds of knowledge and ways of knowing place, then we need to learn to value the different ways each of us sees a single place that is significant, but differently so, for each perspective.
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Bowness Photography Prize 2012 « Previous | |Next »
November 26, 2012

Established in 2006 to promote excellence in photography, the annual non-acquisitive William and Winifred Bowness Photography Prize is an initiative of the MGA Foundation. Among Australia’s most important art prizes, the Bowness Photography Prize is the country’s most coveted photography prize.

The 2012 finalists are here. The winner was Jesse Marlow, the first time a street photographer has won the prize.

MarlowJLaserVision.jpg Jesse Marlow, Laser Vision, 2012, from the series Don't just tell them, show them

Marlow is a member of the Australian documentary photography agency OCULI, and he says that:

Street photography is my main passion. The solitary experience of walking the streets seeking out ‘that’ moment – a rare emotion, a chance sight. And yet, it is often the most everyday things that I keep coming back to, such as people meeting on a summer’s day; a kiss; journeys made on the train.

Street photography, which has a long tradition in photographic history, is experiencing a significant rebirth.

Marlow says that the Don’t Just Tell Them, Show Them’ project:

is a visual reaction to encounters in my daily travels. For me, it’s about searching for the unusual in the ordinary – an ambiguity that lies just below the surface. Set in the environment of everyday, this series aims to explore the banality of modern day existence through themes of abandonment, suburbia and daily rituals...

He want these photos to raise more questions then answers and to to illicit a far greater interaction with the viewer.

| Posted by Gary Sauer-Thompson at 5:07 PM |