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If there are diverse kinds of knowledge and ways of knowing place, then we need to learn to value the different ways each of us sees a single place that is significant, but differently so, for each perspective.
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Lightwork « Previous | |Next »
September 26, 2013

Light Work was founded as an artist-run, non-profit organization in 1973. It aims to provide direct support to artists working in photography and related media, through residencies, publications, exhibitions, and a community-access lab facility. It is housed in the Robert B. Menschel Media Center at Syracuse University, New York, and it has been showcasing contemporary American photographers since 1977.

Though Lightwork supports local artists through a grant program it's exhibition programme has an international focus. They have shown the Hungarian artist Adam Magyar who explorations of the concept of urban life. Magyar depicts the synergies of people, the cities they inhabit, and the technological support structures created to facilitate urban life.

MagyarAKontinuum1.jpg Adam Magyar, Tokyo, 2010, digital silver gelatin print, from the series Stainless

Magyar uses unconventional devices, such as an industrial machine-vision camera that relies on scanning technology. Utilizing software and drivers which he programs himself, Magyar creates constructed images that capture moments in time and place that can neither be seen with the bare eye nor conventional optical cameras.

MagyarAKontinuum.jpg Adam Magyar, Tokyo, 2010, digital silver gelatin print, from the series Stainless

The resulting photographs break with traditional Renaissance-defined perspective. The images combine the aesthetics of classic photography with a technology that redefines our understanding of linear time and singular space in a perfect blend of science and art.

| Posted by Gary Sauer-Thompson at 4:18 PM |