Thought-Factory.net Philosophical Conversations Public Opinion philosophy.com Junk for code

Mandy Martin, Puritjarra 2, 2005. For further information on MANDY MARTIN, refer here: http://www.mandy-martin.com/
If there are diverse kinds of knowledge and ways of knowing place, then we need to learn to value the different ways each of us sees a single place that is significant, but differently so, for each perspective.
RECENT ENTRIES
SEARCH
ARCHIVES
Library
Thinkers/Critics/etc
WEBLOGS
Australian Weblogs
Critical commentary
Visual blogs
CULTURE
ART
PHOTOGRAPHY
DESIGN/STREET ART
ARCHITECTURE/CITY
Film
MUSIC
Sexuality
FOOD & WiNE
Other
www.thought-factory.net
looking for something firm in a world of chaotic flux

an old debate revived « Previous | |Next »
January 15, 2014

Old/new rhetoric has affected the discourses on photography with the emergence of the disruptive emergence of digital technologies and the shift from analogue to digital.

The embracement of the digital is often seen “through the simple binary dialectic of old and new (old/new methods, old/new ontologies, old/new subjectivities, old/new politics) that has characterized the adoption of new media technologies in aesthetic practice.” Not uncommonly, such dichotomous thinking simplifies nuances by willingness to discard the old for the sake of the new.

This kind of discourse sees photographic images as the products of technology rather than culture. This mode of thinking opposes digital imagery to photography and it sees the latter as realist images---simple mirrors held up to mundane realities. Digital imagery, in contrast, constitute a post-photographic culture, represents the creative realm of constructed realities. On the one hand we have science and objective truth, and on the other, we have art and subjective experience of the artist. This dualism has haunted photography since its birth.

Photography, however, is a set cultural practices with different purposes, and we cannot get very far in thinking about these practices in terms of an autonomous technological force.

| Posted by Gary Sauer-Thompson at 2:06 PM |