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If there are diverse kinds of knowledge and ways of knowing place, then we need to learn to value the different ways each of us sees a single place that is significant, but differently so, for each perspective.
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Australian photography: Jeff Moorfoot « Previous | |Next »
August 22, 2014

Jeff Moorfoot is a former advertising photographer, a former Vice President of the Victorian Division of the AIPP, who is currently the Festival Director at the Ballarat International Foto Biennale. He does a magnificient job at ensuring that Australians have access to contemporary art photography in a printed form.

One of Moorfoot's projects was Legumes Morts, which was made with a flatbed scanner replacing the camera as the imaging device. The subject matter was bits of vegetable matter that come from his garden and which were in an advanced state of decomposition. I love the subdued palette and the subtle lighting of this work:

MoorfootJLegumes Morts#1.jpg Jeff Moorfoot, Untitled, 2013, from the series Legumes Morts

This series references, and contemporises, the photograms made in the analogue darkroom and Anna Atkins ' cyanotypes of British algae.

MoorfootJLegumes Mort#2.jpg Jeff Moorfoot, Garlic with Bamboo Leaves, 2013, from the series Legumes Morts

I don't know the process by which this work was done. It looks like careful studio photography (using a Kodak folding camera?) to me along with high grade printing. Is the print then scanned with a flatbed scanner.

Moorfoot currently has a show at Manning Clark House in Canberra entitled Requiem for a Lost Love, which takes a more abstract turn.

| Posted by Gary Sauer-Thompson at 9:01 AM |